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Poverty guidelines

Anonymous started this conversation

 

2007 HHS Poverty Guidelines

Persons
in Family or Household

48 Contiguous
States and D.C.

Alaska

Hawaii

1

$10,210

$12,770

$11,750

2

13,690

17,120

15,750

3

17,170

21,470

19,750

4

20,650

25,820

23,750

5

24,130

30,170

27,750

6

27,610

34,520

31,750

7

31,090

38,870

35,750

8

34,570

43,220

39,750

For each additional
person, add

 3,480

 4,350

 4,000

http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/07poverty.shtml

 

In 2006 – There were 31,802,000 (million) families living in the US with a mother, no husband present, supporting children living at, or below poverty guidelines

http://pubdb3.census.gov/macro/032007/pov/new46_100125_08.htm

Approximate current US population:   302,918,422

Approximately 10% of our population is living in POVERTY

Note: The U.S. POPClock is consistent with Census 2000 data and the most recent national population estimates.

 

What programs use the poverty guidelines?

The HHS poverty guidelines, or percentage multiples of them (such as 125 percent, 150 percent, or 185 percent), are used as an eligibility criterion by a number of federal programs, including those listed below. 

  • Department of Health and Human Services:

    • Community Services Block Grant

    • Head Start

    • Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)

    • Community Food and Nutrition Program

    • PARTS of Medicaid (31 percent of eligibles in Fiscal Year 2004)

    • Hill-Burton Uncompensated Services Program

    • AIDS Drug Assistance Program

    • State Children’s Health Insurance Program

    • Medicare – Prescription Drug Coverage (subsidized portion only)

    • Community Health Centers

    • Migrant Health Centers

    • Family Planning Services

    • Health Professions Student Loans — Loans for Disadvantaged Students

    • Health Careers Opportunity Program

    • Scholarships for Health Professions Students from Disadvantaged Backgrounds

    • Job Opportunities for Low-Income Individuals

    • Assets for Independence Demonstration Program

  • Department of Agriculture:

    • Food Stamp Program

    • Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)

    • National School Lunch Program (for free and reduced-price meals only)

    • School Breakfast Program (for free and reduced-price meals only)

    • Child and Adult Care Food Program (for free and reduced-price meals only)

    • Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program

  • Department of Energy:

    • Weatherization Assistance for Low-Income Persons

  • Department of Labor:

    • Job Corps

    • National Farmworker Jobs Program

    • Senior Community Service Employment Program

    • Workforce Investment Act Youth Activities

  • Department of the Treasury:

    • Low-Income Taxpayer Clinics

  • Corporation for National and Community Service:

    • Foster Grandparent Program

    • Senior Companion Program

  • Legal Services Corporation:

    • Legal Services for the Poor

Most of these programs are non-open-ended programs — that is, programs for which a fixed amount of money is appropriated each year.  The only open-ended or “entitlement” programs that use the poverty guidelines for eligibility are Food Stamps, the National School Lunch Program, certain parts of Medicaid, and the subsidized portion of Medicare – Prescription Drug Coverage.

Some state and local governments have chosen to use the federal poverty guidelines in some of their own programs and activities.  Examples include financial guidelines for child support enforcement and determination of legal indigence for court purposes.  Some private companies (such as utilities, telephone companies, and pharmaceutical companies) and some charitable agencies also use the guidelines in setting eligibility for their services to low-income persons.

Major means-tested programs that do not use the poverty guidelines in determining eligibility include the following:

  • Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and its predecessor, Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) (in most cases)

  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

  • Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)

  • State/local-funded General Assistance (in most cases)

  • Large parts of Medicaid (69 percent of eligibles in Fiscal Year 2004)

  • Section 8 low-income housing assistance

  • Low-rent public housing

http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/faq.shtml#differences

 My questions are:

  • How many of us make more than the income listed but still cannot afford to live?

  • How many do not have transportation?
  • How many do not have health insurance?
  • How many do not have dental insurance?
  • How many of us lie awake at night, wondering:
    •  how long before we are evicted?
    • how long before the utilities are shut off?
    • how long before we run out of food?
    • what we will do if we have a medical crisis?
But yet, we are not poor by the government's standards!
Can someone explain this to me?



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PositiveMommy
Nice Post....and very good questions!
Talk to PositiveMommy